Dating 19th century photographs Free sex chat dirty chat

For example, during the Civil War in 1864, Congress instituted a tax on various goods in order to defray the government’s war debts.

The goods ranged from perfumes and cosmetics to cigar lights, wax tapers, playing cards and photographs, namely ambrotypes, cdvs, tintypes, and daguerreotypes.

Although some of the fascinating women pictured are understood to be lesbian couples, in some cases there is little information about their sexual orientation - nonetheless it is quite extraordinary that these images survive as many old photos of same-sex couples are believed to have been destroyed by family members.

Although it is unknown whether several of the people in the stunning images were related, lesbians or just friends – the tender and close relationship between the women pictured is poignantly evident.

Although it is unknown whether several of the people in the stunning images were related, lesbians or just friends – the tender and close relationship between the women pictured is poignantly evident American actress Charlotte Cushman, left and British writer Matilda Hays, right, pictured here in 1858. Right: Two women share a kiss in 1950 This photograph from 1910 of two women in a close embrace was found in an attic and written on the back was 'Aunty Mary and her "friend" Ruth, 1910.' The quotation marks around friend appear to suggest there is more to their relationship Felice Rahel Schragenheim and Lilly Wust, circa 1942.

The pair enjoyed a 10-year relationship, and Cushman was particularly famous in her home country, even entertaining President Lincoln Dorothy Putnam and Lois Mercer in the 1930s when they started dating. During World War II, Dorothy served in the Women's Ambulance and Transport Corps of California (W. Felice and Lilly were lesbian lovers living in Berlin but Felice was deported to a concentration camp because of her Jewish heritage.

The cabinet card was large enough to be easily viewed from across the room when typically displayed on a cabinet, which is probably why they became known as such in the vernacular.

However, when the renowned Civil War photographer Mathew Brady first started offering them to his clientele towards the end of 1865, he used the trademark "Imperial Carte-de-Visite." Ironically, early into its introduction, the cabinet card ushered in the temporary demise of the photographic album which had come into existence commercially with the carte de visite.

Century Portrait Photographs.” Using his extraordinary slide collection, he illustrated chronologically the development of these remarkable photo types, training the eyes of workshop participants to attend not only to clothing and hair styles but also to studio props, datable objects included in a photo, backgrounds, decorative motifs, housing design and materials, style of mounting, thickness of card stock, hallmarks on metal plates, and more—all clues to dating these enduring historical and artistic treasures.

In addition to the sheer aesthetic pleasure of closely viewing each type of portrait photograph and beginning to learn how to date them, participants learned something of their historical context.

Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, cartes-de-visites (now commonly called cdvs), and cabinet cards.

Changing photo production processes, the history of photo studios and prominent photographers in Newark and elsewhere; Gary Saretzky knows it all.

Some cabinet card images from the 1890s have the appearance of a black-and-white photograph in contrast to the distinctive sepia toning notable in the albumen print process.

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