Validating credit card number length Being able to sex chat without credit online

== 'undefined' && module.exports) ; Prism.languages.clike = ; ; Prism.languages.javascript = Prism.languages.extend('clike', ); Prism.languages.insert Before('javascript', 'keyword', }); if (Prism.languages.markup) ; // Generated by Coffee Script 1.8.0 /* j Query Credit Card Validator 1.0 Copyright 2012-2015 Pawel Decowski Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions: The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

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If attacker would manage to get drop of your database he would get hashed data and salt that is used with plain data to make it obscure, and then cracking that hashed data would be same as if you didn't add any salt to it.2.

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the odds that I can guess a phrase that will hash to the same value as your password).sha1(md5($pass)) makes even less sense, since you're feeding in 128-bits of information to generate a 256-bit hash, so 50% of the resulting data is redundant. GPUs in parallel calculations can handle MD5 over 3 times as fast as SHA1!

Two Radeon 79xx-series GPUs can calculate a rainbow table for 6-character lowercase MD5 password in... Source: been getting few requests to explain how it's used so, this might be little long. In most solutions with hash and salt, you were bound to have one extra row in your database that would state, preferably random, salt for that hashed data.

What you're actually doing is taking some input $passwd, converting it to a string of exactly 32 characters containing only the characters [0-9][A-F], and then hashing *that*.

You have just *greatly* increased the odds of a hash collision (ie. Older CPUs can calculate MD5 over twice as fast as SHA1.

A library for validating credit card numbers and generating ones.

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Rules for sequences to qualify as credit card numbers: Sequences must: -Contain exactly 16 digits; -Start with a 4,5 or 6; -Only consist of digits (0-9).

Sequences may: -Have digits in groups of 4, separated by one hyphen.

You are much much better off adding a variable salt to passwords before hashing (such as the username or other field that is dissimilar for every account).

Double hashing is *worse* security than a regular hash.

total_count = int(raw_input()) numbers_list = [] #refernece list to check the starting series start_list = [4,5,6] for count in range(total_count): numbers_list.append(raw_input()) #condition 1, validates the starting series def val_start(num): if int(num[0]) in start_list: return True else: return False #to check if individial elements of the list are of length=4 #4321-5555-67899-9991, splitted to ["4321","5555","67899","991"] which is invalid def val_group(num): for val in num.split("-"): if len(val) !

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